- Seams And Scissors - https://www.seamsandscissors.com -

Casserole Carrier Sewing Pattern

Hello again, everyone. Carolyn here from Carolyn’s Canvas to share my new, bright, shiny casserole carrier with you.

When I saw Fairfield’s gold Aluminor, I knew almost instantly what it would be used fora casserole carrier. The one I have has seen its better days; it has been to many church suppers, family dinners and picnics. I have reached the point of hiding the carrier under a table quickly after removing the food to keep anyone from seeing its decrepit condition.

DSC04893

The Aluminor is so pretty it could be used for an evening bag, but since I haven’t been invited to any galas recently, I’ll have to settle for a casserole carrier. The material is quilted and thermal insulated, so it keeps things hot or cold. Its 30” width is perfect for the quick, easy carrier I wanted to make.

The carrier is just one piece with added straps. Use the graph below to draw your pattern. I have used brown grocery bags, wrapping paper, or whatever is handy.

For the carrier, you will need:

The Aluminor is easy to cut and work with, and I chose to use bifold binding on the seams to add a decorative touch and strength. My new Wonder Clips worked great to clamp the fabric right side out with binding to sew the seams on the outside.

I made my own straight of grain, bifold binding from a patriotic print I had with a gold fleck which matches the gold Aluminor perfectly. Won’t that be grand showing up at our Memorial Day and July 4th gatherings? I turned the camera on for the few minutes it took to make all the binding I needed for the carrier. 2″ wide strips were cut, pieced together and pressed:

Casserole Carrier.-graph
Click to print pattern

Cut:

  1. carrier from Aluminor or other fabric
  2. straps, tabs and binding from contrast fabric
  3. batting for straps

Sew:

Tabs: right sides facing, sew 5″ sides forming tubes. Turn right side out. Turn ends under 1/2″. Sew to sides A & B as in graph

Straps: place batting strips down wrong side center of straps. Fold 1″ fabric over batting along one side, fold 1/2″ on other side, fold over opposite fabric, top stitch down length of strap. (I like to sew 2 rows of stitching, 1/4″ apart.)

Side: 4″ A to A, 4″ side B to B-right sides facing

with wrong sides facing-sew sides to bottom with binding overlapping seams

Binding: all around top edges, flaps

Insert straps through tabs, sew ends together by folding one edge 1/2″ in, inserting other end

You are done!

It’s so convenient to have just the right size container ready to transport food to whatever I am attending. No more searching for a box or basket or what have you!

I hope you love crafting as much as I do,

Carolyn Wainscott